Showing posts with label social media marketing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label social media marketing. Show all posts

Friday, October 17, 2014

Social Media Teaches Us

In Marketing, it's important for business owners, small in particular, to integrate and aggregate ideas as much as possible, as soon as possible. Your time is valuable. And, since you can't avoid Social Media Marketing as a necessary business development tool, it's important to remember that Social Media teaches us to:


Deal with opinions:  You're going to have them and that's okay. How you express or respond to them is another story. Don't dismiss the bad in favor of the good, and always, always respond to everyone and every situation.

Call everyone out:  No one likes being called out, but we all need to be. There are plenty of examples of this thought but certainly nothing more comparable than being a parent. Managing a business is a lot like being a parent.

Recognize the youngest person in the room:  Well, young may be relative, so how about:  recognize the person with the freshest idea at the time - not necessarily the best idea, but certainly the newest & the boldest - even if it's as quickly dismissed as it is heard.

Most importantly, it's critical to stay on the innovative & early adoption side of technologies, tools, & resources. This is true even if you have a dedicated team managing marketing and influencing your brand. And all of this is just the start because Social Media Marketing never sleeps and never stops. 

What does Social Media teach you?


Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Spring Clean Your Marketing!

Springtime! While you're opening the windows, tightening the clothesline, and preparing the mop water, it's also a great time to clean up the cobwebs around your personal and business marketing strategies.

For many businesses, this time of year marks the end of a first quarter. As results are reviewed, it's also an ideal time to review and adjust your Marketing Plan. Here are just a few questions to consider:

  • Did the the marketing strategies help achieve the desired business goals? Finding the ROI in marketing is as critical to review as sales and profit reviews.
  • What strategies and activities need to be reconsidered or revised? Avoid the 'this is the way we've always done it' mindset and change the way the you do business
  • Are there new or additional marketing strategies to integrate? Marketing, like every other piece of a business model, is a process of continuous improvement.
  • Do staff & coworkers fully leverage social media? Encouraging others to engage is as important as ensuring content is relevant
This chore is equally important for your personal marketing deployment. Among other questions, ask yourself:
  • When was the last time I updated my social media personal profiles? Freshen up your online appearance and discover yourself all over again
  • Do I need to add or remove any personal connections? Keep or find the connections that add value to personal & career ambitions. Moreover, clicking 'Remove' is more meaningful than clicking 'Hide'.
  • Am I making the most of my online interactions? Remember: social media is about sharing, so . . . share
  • What platforms do I need to be more active on? Connecting across the social media universe is always better than only engaging on Linkedin.
Marketing defines us. It is a reflection of our personal endeavors and our professional engagements. So while you're finding the time to clean up the other parts of your life and business, why not take a moment to spring clean your marketing strategies?


Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Marketing Starts With You!

Marketing all starts with you. You are the "who" and the "what" when people think of your business. You know "where" you want your business to go and "how" to get there. And, "when" you get down to it, you are your business’ best marketing resource!


Exploring all of the marketing options today may seem a formidable task, but there are some concepts that seem to rise to the top. As of 2013 (and looking into 2014), a lot of these trends revolve around:




If these particular trends tell us anything, it’s that we live in the digital landscape - at home, at work, and on the go. A good question for any business, organization, or cause then becomes:


What is the impact of life on the digital landscape?


The overall impact of marketing touches everyone, every day. Whether it’s a student opening a laptop for class, a sales person demonstrating their products on a tablet, or a busy mom demonstrating to her kiddo how she manages shopping on her smartphone with an app, the potential touch points for marketing are everywhere.


Still, each impactful marketing moment is both utilized and perceived differently by the individual versus a more collaborative, if not complete, whole. These marketing moments aren’t just good for promoting your business, they create a social good.

By sharing, individuals become better innovators and thought leaders, businesses collaborate more often, and markets come together as communities. And all of this creates a global social good in which industries work together to change the world.

So, are you ready to get started?

Thursday, August 1, 2013

Marketing Classes: Leveraging Marketing for You & Your Business

Market Integrations offers customized Marketing Classes can be offered at your office, a local venue, or even virtually. 

Class Description
The overall intent for these classes is to demonstrate effective Marketing actions & strategies to create and develop a business’ Marketing Plan for future business growth. The course will address current marketing trends & options, integrative marketing communication methods, and tools & resources to analyze and manage marketing efforts, and strategies for continuous improvement. Small business owners and individuals interested in improving their general marketing acumen will benefit the most from these classes.

About the Instructor

Stirling Morris, is Owner and Marketing Executive for Market Integrationswww.marketintegrations.com, a Marketing firm based in Dallas, Texas. For over the last decade, Stirling has been involved in Business Development, Sales, & Marketing. Stirling has also worked as an Educator as well as holding a few key Management and Senior Management positions for multi-million revenue generating businesses. Market Integrations provides Marketing Development & Marketing Management strategies that can be applied in any market and any industry.

Each class can be designed for your personal, business, or organizational needs including content, personnel considerations, and scheduled time and dates. Here are a few class ideas to help you improve your Marketing know-how:

  • An Introduction to Marketing Today 
  • Marketing Your Business Starts with Marketing You 
  • Reinforcing Marketing with Social Media Business Pages 
  • Developing & Integrating an Effective Marketing Plan 
  • Great Marketing is a Process of Continuous Improvement 

Contact Market Integrations today to arrange for your customized Marketing Class!

stirlingmorris@marketintegrations.com

972-786-2004

Friday, July 5, 2013

The First Rule of Marketing Is...

Unlike Fight Club, the first rule of Social Media is:

You do talk about marketing.

The second rule of Social Media is:

You DO talk about marketing!

She, he, I . . . no matter what your pronoun may be, Social Media revolves around one core concept: interpersonal communication.

From the moment it became a mainstream, daily focus, Social Media opened a doorway to how we interact online. It's about sharing your thoughts, opinions, and experiences on an interpersonal level, personally and even professionally. Social Media has become the 21st century poster child for defining who you are, who you're connected with, and why anyone would want to connect with you.

Add the word Marketing at the end of "Social Media" and suddenly things becomes a lot more volatile. Whether it's a retail giant channeling their latest holiday sale, a world recognized non-profit looking for your donation, or a professional organization looking to gain your membership, Social Media Marketing is the underground advertising and marketing syndicate fighting for your loyalty; because when it comes to the marketable actions of Social Media for businesses and organizations, it's not about who they know, it's about who you know and how they can reach out to your contacts.

The more people any one particular person is connected with, the more potential that viral or word of mouth marketing will be operating at it's finest. This assumes that the business or organization practicing Social Media Marketing has implemented a marketing plan and a marketing management person or team to facilitate the effort. The more you and I, as Social Media users, interact with said businesses' and organizations' established marketing plans, the more opportunities that those businesses or organizations stand to gain grows exponentially.

Additionally, most brand recognized Social Media platforms have, at least, some simple analytical tools. These tools measure Social Media Marketing efforts with specific outreach information, but there are other, and in some cases better, third party resources. In order for businesses and organizations to grow through effective Social Media Marketing, integrating these tools into the Marketing Plan is essential.

Not sure what Marketing tools and resources you might want to integrate into your business' or organization's efforts? Maybe it's time to ask.

What Social Media Marketing tools and resources do you find most useful to measure your marketing success?

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Marketing Habits I Learned from Writers

It seems everyone threatens to write a book at one point or another, and self-publishing a book seems to be the talk of the town lately.  From newcomers with a story they're itching to get off of their chests, to more suggestive non-fiction pieces like Guy Kawasaki's, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur - How to Publish a Book, the writing world is changing. To quote Mark Coker, Founder of Smashwords: "We're in the early stages of a full scale publishing renaissance."

My wife, Dannie M Olguin, has been writing her whole life and within the last year, started publishing short story ebooks under a pen name. Dannie is also almost done with one of her life-long ambitions of writing at least one novel and having it published.  She's still trying to decide whether to pursue traditional publishing or follow the route of self-publishing.

This whole experience with Dannie has taught me a lot about self-publishing. Even more importantly, as a marketer, the experience has taught me about the writing process. There are many lessons I picked up from the writing process, but two that stand out in comparing and contrasting Writing & Marketing are:

Building a Plan
The best marketing lesson I gleaned was from the outlining process. Outlining a story and outlining a Marketing Plan hold similar concepts.  Both help get the ideas flowing and the balls rolling. And, eventually, the story's outline & the Marketing Plan outline develop a life of their own.

All About the Numbers
One of the more interesting writing habits revolved around accounting. I'm not referring to the revenue generation, although, let's face it, even writers love to get checks. I'm referring to the daily word counting and total word count that writers use to gauge productivity. It is uncanny how this compares to budget planning versus profits from actual revenue.

In two industries where content is king, it is amazing just how similar a path marketing and writing follow. Both morph through a process of continuous improvement, and the result of the final product must be masterfully creative enough to engage an audience.

What marketing strategies have you improved by comparing your business to other industries?

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Social Media: A Sales Perspective

I originally wrote this piece from Market Integration's website as:

Social Media - A Salesperson Perspective

posted Aug 23, 2011, 3:51 PM by Stirling Morris   [ updated Dec 12, 2011, 3:12 PM ]


We're all salespeople.  Whether you're a mom trying to explain to your child why practicing good hygiene is important or you're a CEO out to lunch with a new investor prospect, we all have something to sell.  Some of us are really good at it and some of us aren't.  But most of us don't even realize we're selling until our client (or child) agrees or disagrees with whatever we've pitched.

No matter who you are or what you do, social media is a not only a tool for networking but for selling.  Unfortunately, not every company has learned this lesson.  I actually had a General Manager of a sales company in the construction industry once tell me, “Networking must be limited to assure it does not take any time away from selling.”  I don't think he realized the power of social media in sales and networking.

I was asked by a Retail Sales Manager within the same company for advice regarding networking; particularly through social media.  After spending years as a sales / product representative in the construction industry, here are some of the finer points I offered:
  • In addition to joining professional organizations, social media is the key to business relationships for tomorrow to keep you informed when you can't be present or just to stay up-to-date with industry activities
  • Connecting and engaging with individuals and businesses on facebookLinkedin, Google+, and Twitter is vital to a successful, long-term relationship with tomorrow’s customers.
  • Most importantly, actively participating (e.g. joining groups, asking questions and giving answers) is the best way to make social media successful and you potentially seen as a Thought Leader. You can’t just create a social media profile / page and expect customers to come knocking. If people don’t see you engaged, they won’t follow back. And, if you only promote yourself, your business, or your services, you are committing sales suicide and will often be hidden or blocked by your customer's (or potential customer's) social media feeds.
Social Media helps us grow as people by creating interactive dialogue when a phone call or in-person visit or meeting isn't feasible.


Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Determining The Value of Seminars & Presentations

When it comes to presentations and seminars in your market or industry, some are free and some cost the same as a great used car.  Some last all week and others can be given as a one hour lunch and learn. The worst are those that have great marketing to get you there, but offer absolutely nothing of value once you sit down. With so many options, how does anyone determine the value of seminars & presentations?

I've heard this question asked multiple times from individuals, businesses, & organizations, big and small, and there doesn't appear to be one answer.  There are so many types of seminars & presentations and these are further distorted by market and industry.  Through my career presentation experiences (giving and receiving), I have found there are two common denominators in determining the value of presentations & seminars - an enlightening presenter & a willing audience.

An Enlightening Presenter

I have heard many people say that a charismatic speaker can carry an audience no matter what the topic, atmosphere, or setting.  There are many things that make a speaker great, including charisma.  But when it comes to seminars & presentations, I want to be enlightened not charmed.

An enlightening presenter demonstrates as much, if not more, innovative thought as knowledge.  Don't spin and dance around what I already know or can read by myself.  Inspire me.  Most importantly, by the time the seminar or presentation is finished I should want to inspire others.

A Willing Audience

The value of an education is dependent on the work we put into it. I think a lot of adults forget this and look at education as a means to an end.  This is a huge mistake when it concerns the value of a presentation or seminar. The audience has just as much responsibility to enlighten themselves before and after they participate, if not just on a surface level.

Let's take marketing, for example.  If you plan on attending a Marketing seminar that is going to focus on how to integrate Google+ as a social media marketing tool for your business, show up having already registered for and experimented with the platform.  If you don't, this will only cause frustration for you.

Information and knowledge are not synonymous. A great seminar or presentation is lost on an audience unwilling to educate themselves before the event and then use that knowledge to further their education after.
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Learning always comes with a price if not just in the form of your time.  The value of a presentation or seminar depends just as much on your eagerness to be inspired as it for the presenter to be inspiring.  If this type of inspiration is present, then the cost becomes inconsequential - well, almost.

What are some examples of seminars or presentations that have inspired you?

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

Celebrating Independence in Marketing


The internet and online marketing has allowed us the freedom to be able to access, maintain, and manipulate projects and campaigns in an instant.  We are able to find the right application for any given marketing task, and when we can't, we know that we can either work to create it or find someone else to help us with it to create positive and successful changes. 

As the US celebrates the 4th of July today, I am reminded how these innovative changes in marketing are similar to how the founders of this country looked at change.  I'm not referring to the circumstances that led up to the US claiming independence, but rather how the founders of this country looked to future and the positive changes that developed from their efforts.

The founders of the US worked hard to escape persecution and to start a new life.  They wrote proclamations and declarations that focused on what was right & just at the time with high hopes of creating a better future.  But have US citizens become too focused on celebrating what the founders of their country did rather than what they dreamed?

I believe that they wanted us to move on and to not get too settled on traditionalism, that we shouldn’t march to the beat of someone else’s drum beat so many years ago and for so many past issues (resolved or not), and that, no matter what your philosophical, scientific, or religious stance is in life, that we should grow and evolve.

Marketing, like many other facets of the business world, is constantly evolving to help us sustain growth.  These constant changes in marketing allow us to claim independence from each older marketing effort.  Celebrating this independence in marketing is helping to create a more innovative and fruitful future.

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Marketing Know-Meow: Love the Dog, Trust the Cat


We can learn a lot by looking at the world around us.  In architecture & engineering, there is a concept called biomimicry which examines nature's elements, systems, and processes as inspiration for creative design.  In marketing, we can develop a lot of marketing know-how by examining aspects of the natural world.  For example, we can learn a lot from our canine and feline family relationships to further understand marketing concepts.  

On the feline front, a cat will be smug and make you work hard to win its affection, and then, ultimately, do what it wants anyway.  This is comparable to what keeps us on our marketing development toes - always looking for the next innovative idea no matter how it may be received.  These popular marketing ideas may be short lived or long lasting.  But, either way, these ideas are successful until they evolve into the next great concept.  Like the Egyptian's perception of a cat, this allows us to see other worlds and other possibilities.

Conversely, you don't have to work very hard to win a dog's love and affection.  Once a relationship is established with our canine cohorts, a dog will return that love and devotion without question.  In marketing, or even business in general, this is tantamount to having positive relations with customers.  Your devotion for each other is ensured once established.  However, there is a danger that this will ultimately stymie creative thought and new marketing ventures.  We can get too comfortable with the tried and true.

So, what does this teach us?  Love the dog to create and maintain positive marketing relations, but trust the cat to bring new and improved thought.  Meow, what do you think?