Showing posts with label planning. Show all posts
Showing posts with label planning. Show all posts

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Celebrate Success With A Reboot

Success! We all crave it and love to celebrate it. But after the party ends, perhaps that's an ideal moment to reboot and hone in on what you can do better yet.

Rebooting offers us the opportunity to discover better strategies to improve our lives and our relationships. Consider the movie version Tony Stark from The Avengers. He goes from carefree, burger-gorging playboy, to growing through the many phases of just being IronMan, and, ultimately, into the blueberry-eating, sustainable design-building hero of The Avengers.

But the story doesn't stop there. Tony continues to re-define himself, his team, and relationships. Each success becomes a jumping off point for the next venture. Individuals like Richard Branson and Elon Musk do the same, and global enterprises like Google and Amazon are no strangers to this way of continuous improvement. Continuous improvement exercises are at the core of many successful organizational models globally. Strategies like Kaizen (改善) are also often employed and embrace activities that continuously improve an organization's complete infrastructure involving all employees, from the CEO to the people on the assembly line or in the field.

Celebrating the win is never more important than the action that led you there and certainly not as critical as what you do next - this being as true for science and business as it is for politics and sports. But, if your main objective is to win, well, then, you've already lost. 

Winning is only a stepping stone. If you're not talking about the next big thing, then you're talking about the wrong thing. It's about the long game. It's about healthy, sustainable living over brand and personality. It's about standing on the shoulders of giants and reaching ever higher. It's about change. Progress takes change.

So at the end of the day, by all means, celebrate your successes - frequently and happily. But when you get the chance, reboot and set the tone for our shared lives tomorrow.


Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Trustworthy


We may not always agree with decisions made by others, but we should always strive to work with those decisions. In some cases, this does mean finding ways to work without them.

But if we always operate with integrity, passion, and kindness, our agreeing with others has little impact on our successes. People tend to always work for, buy from, coordinate with people they trust.

This is especially true when choosing to recommend others. To be referred is the ultimate test of being considered trustworthy. Where trust is concerned, our ability to work with others is the lifeblood of our success. 

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Where Does Marketing Begin?




Whether you are a solopreneur, a start-up team with a new innovative concept, an existing business looking to revamp its business model, or an industry specific non-profit organization:


Marketing begins with the individual. Marketing is as much about the individual as it is about the collective whole. It all begins with ownership and executive leadership and touches every staff person, subcontractor, supplier, and, ultimately, customer.


Marketing requires planning. No matter the size of the business or organization, having a Marketing Plan is just as critical as a Business Plan. It is a supplemental piece that is a tool for monitoring & measuring Marketing both internally and externally.


Having a separate Social Media Marketing Plan can be a good supplemental component of the Marketing Plan.


Marketing weaves itself throughout every business, market, & industry. From Advertising & Business Development through Sales & Customer Service, Marketing plays a huge part of business growth. It touches each and every employee, customer, and business relation with satisfaction at the root of success.


Marketing is a process of Continuous Improvement. Just as a Business Plan sets long term goals that takes into consideration our ever-evolving world, so must the Marketing Strategies. It’s not enough to adopt in business, you have to adapt.


Do you want to be seen (or have your business seen) as an innovator, an adopter, or a laggard. This will impact your business growth as you are viewed through the lens of the customer’s, employee’s, and public’s perception.


The Takeaway: Marketing is responsible for breathing life and changing the direction of how every person, business, and organization grows.


The impact of technology and innovation changes too rapidly for anyone to boast a solid solution to Marketing know-how. The best anyone can offer for marketing solutions guidance is an outline of where marketing is today and, more importantly, to encourage you to always ask:

Where is marketing going tomorrow?

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Marketing Habits I Learned from Writers

It seems everyone threatens to write a book at one point or another, and self-publishing a book seems to be the talk of the town lately.  From newcomers with a story they're itching to get off of their chests, to more suggestive non-fiction pieces like Guy Kawasaki's, APE: Author, Publisher, Entrepreneur - How to Publish a Book, the writing world is changing. To quote Mark Coker, Founder of Smashwords: "We're in the early stages of a full scale publishing renaissance."

My wife, Dannie M Olguin, has been writing her whole life and within the last year, started publishing short story ebooks under a pen name. Dannie is also almost done with one of her life-long ambitions of writing at least one novel and having it published.  She's still trying to decide whether to pursue traditional publishing or follow the route of self-publishing.

This whole experience with Dannie has taught me a lot about self-publishing. Even more importantly, as a marketer, the experience has taught me about the writing process. There are many lessons I picked up from the writing process, but two that stand out in comparing and contrasting Writing & Marketing are:

Building a Plan
The best marketing lesson I gleaned was from the outlining process. Outlining a story and outlining a Marketing Plan hold similar concepts.  Both help get the ideas flowing and the balls rolling. And, eventually, the story's outline & the Marketing Plan outline develop a life of their own.

All About the Numbers
One of the more interesting writing habits revolved around accounting. I'm not referring to the revenue generation, although, let's face it, even writers love to get checks. I'm referring to the daily word counting and total word count that writers use to gauge productivity. It is uncanny how this compares to budget planning versus profits from actual revenue.

In two industries where content is king, it is amazing just how similar a path marketing and writing follow. Both morph through a process of continuous improvement, and the result of the final product must be masterfully creative enough to engage an audience.

What marketing strategies have you improved by comparing your business to other industries?

Thursday, February 7, 2013

The Delicate Art of Getting Things Done

Whether you're following your regular work calendar or having an impromptu meeting about the recent lack of ROI from your marketing team, today you will break up your schedule into the smallest units of time to get things done. You'll find yourself saying things like:

"I can have that to you by next week."
"Give me five minutes."
". . . just a second"

All of which you might be saying to others, yourself, or even your computer which is always slow to process whatever you're working on at the most inopportune moment. This process never ends as you map and plan out tomorrow's schedule.

And planning is, of course, a good thing.  In fact it's completely necessary - especially when it concerns our professional lives.  But when our professional lives become so dependent on time that we have to make time for family and friends, maybe it's time to stop and reevaluate how you spend your time. 

When reappropriating your time, consider:
  • Time for yourself:  topping the charts, this may or may not include time with family and friends, but it definitely excludes anything even remotely work related.  Stopping to smell the roses not only rejuvenates the body and mind, but it also allows you to reboot and take fresh perspectives for work, family, and personal activities.  This also includes mandatory physical exercise of the body and mind nourishment such as reading books and listening to music OUTSIDE OF YOUR CAR!
  • Time for your relationships:  from the family and friend side, this is ensures that you're not a negative topic that others roll their eyes at or hide your posts in facebook.  From the work perspective, your interpersonal relationships need to be nurtured to cultivate new ideas and conversation and not just talk about shared projects and upcoming meetings.  If you're going to play golf for example, play golf; but just play golf.
  • Time for work:  this has less to do with filling in your Google calendar and more to do with following your passion.  If you spend more time worrying about gaining or retaining clients and less time about the process of why your working with or for them, then you're wasting your time.  Work should always be pleasurable, and if it isn't, then it's definitely time to find work that you can feel passionate about.
Filling in a calendar can be easy enough, but realizing the delicate art of getting things done is more challenging and more rewarding.

Wednesday, January 23, 2013

Integrating Resolutions, Goals & Projections Into Your Business Plan


I set personal and business goals, however, I'm not one to make New Year's resolutions.  But I do love hearing and reading everyone else's grandiose ideas and the varying ways to make them happen.  There are always so many great thoughts and methods to accomplish them, that I always glean something I had not thought of before - even if I morph it into something else.  

I also enjoy reading all of the projections for business trends and technological changes.  Most of the projections seem fairly similar and generally supported by the same root sources with a few varying thoughts.  Ultimately, It's good to be reminded of what happened during the year and where we might be headed. 

As the calendar year draws to a close, many businesses wrap up fiscal years also.  This is a busy time for many businesses.  They're not only closing the books on one year, but also revamping their one and five year business plans.

With so much change to consider, why not combine your New Year’s resolutions and your goals with your yearly business plan revision to make the outcomes more realistic for both.  And, even with reasonable business planning and goal setting, there's always going to be the need for change as the year progresses.  

When addressing this concept on Twitter today, it was good to hear similar thoughts from a long time friend of mine:

@StirlingMorris - Yes, goals are VERY necessary! People should have them for sure. I think they should just do it more than once a year! :)

Your personal and business goals can be specific, but, with all of the constant change in our lives and professions even a general outline can be effective.