Showing posts with label meeting. Show all posts
Showing posts with label meeting. Show all posts

Tuesday, March 8, 2016

Meeting Climate Change Demands Is a Global Effort


Not so long ago, on a planet your feet are currently planted on . . .

. . . the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change held the 2015 conference in Paris. This was not the first global conference to address our focus on climate change, nor will it be the last. But, it was a pivotal moment for humanity. For the first time, in our history, we decided to act as a united world of various governments to combat as many climate change challenges as possible.

Although the Paris Agreement that came out of this event was adopted, the actionable outcome won't fully be realized until 2020 and is not expected to be signed until April 22nd, 2016. It is, however, an indicator of impactful thinking that will change how we address climate change in our day-to-day lives and world commerce. Corporations, in particular, linking our global commerce efforts, will be forced to investigate business model changes that 187 countries producing 99% of global greenhouse gas emissions are asking, and will continue to ask, them to do.

Now, not all of us have the time or money to be as proactive as Richard Branson or Elon Musk, or have as much unrestrained, self awareness to act like Kumi Naidoo or Jane Goodall. But, we are all responsible to make this change sustainable. How? I'm glad you asked . . .

Individuals - Do you practice daily efforts to reduce, reuse, and recycle? Do you shop at local businesses, grower's markets, and food co-ops? Do you compost daily? Carrying reusable bags for every shopping excursion as well as gardening & composting (I recommend vermicomposting) in your back yard, isn't as big of a task as you think - at least once you get started.

Businesses - Does your business embrace recycling efforts, from the top level down? Do you purchase or sell products and services derived from sustainable programs? Does your business have a Corporate Social Responsibility program built into the Business Plan? If businesses are updating their business models no less than yearly, making sustainable, meaningful change shouldn't be such an arduous task.

Industries - If individuals and their business models are the trains of thought that motivate us to change, then industries are most definitely the tracks that unite us and get us there. From small government to the UN, global policy change is driven by the industries that create the civil engineered roads we drive on, the architecturally structured buildings we live and work in, and the products & services that are the foundation. 

An industry that continues to surprise me is the film industry. Global in scale, it has moved far beyond Michael Moore's and Al Gore's valiant efforts to talk about the things we have deliberately chosen to ignore. Leonardo DiCaprio's awareness campaigning at the Academy Awards, not to discount his involvement in the People's Climate March or presentation to UN delegates, brought to light a changing tide in how we view & address global climate change. Celebrities as advocates for social change is nothing new, but addressing it through an industry like film, and then allowing public media, and especially social media, to run rampant with the notion, is phenomenally awesome.

What sustainable efforts do you embrace every day? Because one thing is certain - there is no fence riding on this one. It's up to us, all of us, each and every one of us, worldwide, to keep the momentum going. 

Thursday, February 7, 2013

The Delicate Art of Getting Things Done

Whether you're following your regular work calendar or having an impromptu meeting about the recent lack of ROI from your marketing team, today you will break up your schedule into the smallest units of time to get things done. You'll find yourself saying things like:

"I can have that to you by next week."
"Give me five minutes."
". . . just a second"

All of which you might be saying to others, yourself, or even your computer which is always slow to process whatever you're working on at the most inopportune moment. This process never ends as you map and plan out tomorrow's schedule.

And planning is, of course, a good thing.  In fact it's completely necessary - especially when it concerns our professional lives.  But when our professional lives become so dependent on time that we have to make time for family and friends, maybe it's time to stop and reevaluate how you spend your time. 

When reappropriating your time, consider:
  • Time for yourself:  topping the charts, this may or may not include time with family and friends, but it definitely excludes anything even remotely work related.  Stopping to smell the roses not only rejuvenates the body and mind, but it also allows you to reboot and take fresh perspectives for work, family, and personal activities.  This also includes mandatory physical exercise of the body and mind nourishment such as reading books and listening to music OUTSIDE OF YOUR CAR!
  • Time for your relationships:  from the family and friend side, this is ensures that you're not a negative topic that others roll their eyes at or hide your posts in facebook.  From the work perspective, your interpersonal relationships need to be nurtured to cultivate new ideas and conversation and not just talk about shared projects and upcoming meetings.  If you're going to play golf for example, play golf; but just play golf.
  • Time for work:  this has less to do with filling in your Google calendar and more to do with following your passion.  If you spend more time worrying about gaining or retaining clients and less time about the process of why your working with or for them, then you're wasting your time.  Work should always be pleasurable, and if it isn't, then it's definitely time to find work that you can feel passionate about.
Filling in a calendar can be easy enough, but realizing the delicate art of getting things done is more challenging and more rewarding.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Social Media: A Sales Perspective

I originally wrote this piece from Market Integration's website as:

Social Media - A Salesperson Perspective

posted Aug 23, 2011, 3:51 PM by Stirling Morris   [ updated Dec 12, 2011, 3:12 PM ]


We're all salespeople.  Whether you're a mom trying to explain to your child why practicing good hygiene is important or you're a CEO out to lunch with a new investor prospect, we all have something to sell.  Some of us are really good at it and some of us aren't.  But most of us don't even realize we're selling until our client (or child) agrees or disagrees with whatever we've pitched.

No matter who you are or what you do, social media is a not only a tool for networking but for selling.  Unfortunately, not every company has learned this lesson.  I actually had a General Manager of a sales company in the construction industry once tell me, “Networking must be limited to assure it does not take any time away from selling.”  I don't think he realized the power of social media in sales and networking.

I was asked by a Retail Sales Manager within the same company for advice regarding networking; particularly through social media.  After spending years as a sales / product representative in the construction industry, here are some of the finer points I offered:
  • In addition to joining professional organizations, social media is the key to business relationships for tomorrow to keep you informed when you can't be present or just to stay up-to-date with industry activities
  • Connecting and engaging with individuals and businesses on facebookLinkedin, Google+, and Twitter is vital to a successful, long-term relationship with tomorrow’s customers.
  • Most importantly, actively participating (e.g. joining groups, asking questions and giving answers) is the best way to make social media successful and you potentially seen as a Thought Leader. You can’t just create a social media profile / page and expect customers to come knocking. If people don’t see you engaged, they won’t follow back. And, if you only promote yourself, your business, or your services, you are committing sales suicide and will often be hidden or blocked by your customer's (or potential customer's) social media feeds.
Social Media helps us grow as people by creating interactive dialogue when a phone call or in-person visit or meeting isn't feasible.