Showing posts with label industry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label industry. Show all posts

Monday, March 11, 2019

Value Engineering The Project Team

Construction project teams are some of the most diverse groups you can ever work with. From owners, architects, and city councils working through design conception to subcontractors and building supervisors addressing facility management - and through all phases of construction in between - every team member is vital to each project's success. Project teams represent who we are and who we choose to be.

Make no mistake, trust is huge factor to make this work. To ensure trust is a deliverable, every project team member works as diligently as the next to grow themselves, their company's vision, and the project in turn. When project teams learns to value one another, the resulting dynamic are projects that grow and evolve as much as individuals do. Trust may be earned, but it should never be limited.

Being humble is another important aspect in delivering successful projects. When individuals place themselves above others, they negate all of the positive potential that defines the construction process - a process that creates every resource we use, every road we travel, and every structure we live, work, and play in. Construction project teams don't just build; they are a representation of our communities.



Like all organized efforts, construction project teams work to create innovative solutions through a process of continuous improvement. Continuous improvement strategies build upon existing work to improve future deliverables. When one part of the team feels empowered, the entire team can sense that empowerment throughout the project life cycle. An empowered project team encourages others to develop continuous improvement exercises, for both the job at hand as well as future developments.

As with every industry and sector working around the globe, project teams have an obligation to assist each other, the project, and continuous improvement processes to deliver successful projects. No matter the role, a project team's success is fully dependent on encouraging diversity and embracing equity in the workplace. Shared equity in work practices is how we value engineer project teams and design a sustainable future.


Originally shared by Stirling Morris here, https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/value-engineering-project-team-stirling-morris-csi-cdt/ 

Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Marketing Reminds Us

You've achieved success and earned the privilege of meeting your customer. They've come in, contacted you, or expressed interest in your product or service. So? What's next? 

Unlike sales, marketing is your first opportunity to demonstrate what you offer. It gives you the chance to set yourself apart from others. Because of this, marketing is as much a reminder for you as it is for anyone else.

Marketing reminds us of who we are. Think about who you were yesterday. Think back a year. How about ten years? You're not the same (or at least I hope you're not). You grew. Your business grew. Appreciating we all do, why would you offer the same conversation today that you did yesterday?

Marketing reminds us to innovate. Research & development are as vital to our collective successes as they are to us individually. Continuous improvement strategies help us improve and realize our goals. But it's our innovations that keep the conversation going. 

Marketing reminds us that we're never alone. Individuals and groups reach out to others to grow. Individually, or even as singular business model, we may offer a well conceived product or service, but it's through organizational & industry alliances that we really make a difference, for ourselves and others.

Marketing never stops. Marketing is the reminder.

What does Marketing remind you to do?

Monday, April 22, 2013

Encouraging Employees to be Your Brand Stewards

Marketing a business can be a daunting task. This is especially true when you are a small business and don't have a dedicated marketing person or team to lead the charge. However, the strongest brand steward a business has for marketing and getting the branded product or service message out is it's team - the whole team.

If you look at your business like a megaphone, with your voice at the mouthpiece, you can really let the public hear your passion through your words and actions. Now, take that megaphone, enlarge it, fill it with the voices of all of your staff shouting the same brand message, and really get the message out.

The following are a few good considerations. Some may seem obvious and some may just be reminders, but as a whole, it's better to prepared:

Passion
If you don't share your passion with your staff, it certainly won't be conveyed well to your customers, potential customers, and industry partners.

Drive
Finding the drive to support your passion is key to marketing success and will be noticed - even when you feel it's not.

Motivation
Ideally, staff members don't just depend on an employer for a paycheck, so if you're motivating your staff constantly & consistently, they'll appreciate you all that much more.

No matter how you spin it, employees should never be forced to blare a message they feel is not their own. A business' employees are brand stewards, not soldiers. This is even true when you are working with contracted or outsourced partners.

Each person on a business' staff brings as much marketing potential as a dedicated marketing team member. When you encourage employees to be your brand steward, your marketing voice will be exponentially amplified no matter what your market or industry may be.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Social Media: A Sales Perspective

I originally wrote this piece from Market Integration's website as:

Social Media - A Salesperson Perspective

posted Aug 23, 2011, 3:51 PM by Stirling Morris   [ updated Dec 12, 2011, 3:12 PM ]


We're all salespeople.  Whether you're a mom trying to explain to your child why practicing good hygiene is important or you're a CEO out to lunch with a new investor prospect, we all have something to sell.  Some of us are really good at it and some of us aren't.  But most of us don't even realize we're selling until our client (or child) agrees or disagrees with whatever we've pitched.

No matter who you are or what you do, social media is a not only a tool for networking but for selling.  Unfortunately, not every company has learned this lesson.  I actually had a General Manager of a sales company in the construction industry once tell me, “Networking must be limited to assure it does not take any time away from selling.”  I don't think he realized the power of social media in sales and networking.

I was asked by a Retail Sales Manager within the same company for advice regarding networking; particularly through social media.  After spending years as a sales / product representative in the construction industry, here are some of the finer points I offered:
  • In addition to joining professional organizations, social media is the key to business relationships for tomorrow to keep you informed when you can't be present or just to stay up-to-date with industry activities
  • Connecting and engaging with individuals and businesses on facebookLinkedin, Google+, and Twitter is vital to a successful, long-term relationship with tomorrow’s customers.
  • Most importantly, actively participating (e.g. joining groups, asking questions and giving answers) is the best way to make social media successful and you potentially seen as a Thought Leader. You can’t just create a social media profile / page and expect customers to come knocking. If people don’t see you engaged, they won’t follow back. And, if you only promote yourself, your business, or your services, you are committing sales suicide and will often be hidden or blocked by your customer's (or potential customer's) social media feeds.
Social Media helps us grow as people by creating interactive dialogue when a phone call or in-person visit or meeting isn't feasible.


Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Determining The Value of Seminars & Presentations

When it comes to presentations and seminars in your market or industry, some are free and some cost the same as a great used car.  Some last all week and others can be given as a one hour lunch and learn. The worst are those that have great marketing to get you there, but offer absolutely nothing of value once you sit down. With so many options, how does anyone determine the value of seminars & presentations?

I've heard this question asked multiple times from individuals, businesses, & organizations, big and small, and there doesn't appear to be one answer.  There are so many types of seminars & presentations and these are further distorted by market and industry.  Through my career presentation experiences (giving and receiving), I have found there are two common denominators in determining the value of presentations & seminars - an enlightening presenter & a willing audience.

An Enlightening Presenter

I have heard many people say that a charismatic speaker can carry an audience no matter what the topic, atmosphere, or setting.  There are many things that make a speaker great, including charisma.  But when it comes to seminars & presentations, I want to be enlightened not charmed.

An enlightening presenter demonstrates as much, if not more, innovative thought as knowledge.  Don't spin and dance around what I already know or can read by myself.  Inspire me.  Most importantly, by the time the seminar or presentation is finished I should want to inspire others.

A Willing Audience

The value of an education is dependent on the work we put into it. I think a lot of adults forget this and look at education as a means to an end.  This is a huge mistake when it concerns the value of a presentation or seminar. The audience has just as much responsibility to enlighten themselves before and after they participate, if not just on a surface level.

Let's take marketing, for example.  If you plan on attending a Marketing seminar that is going to focus on how to integrate Google+ as a social media marketing tool for your business, show up having already registered for and experimented with the platform.  If you don't, this will only cause frustration for you.

Information and knowledge are not synonymous. A great seminar or presentation is lost on an audience unwilling to educate themselves before the event and then use that knowledge to further their education after.
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Learning always comes with a price if not just in the form of your time.  The value of a presentation or seminar depends just as much on your eagerness to be inspired as it for the presenter to be inspiring.  If this type of inspiration is present, then the cost becomes inconsequential - well, almost.

What are some examples of seminars or presentations that have inspired you?