Showing posts with label facebook. Show all posts
Showing posts with label facebook. Show all posts

Thursday, February 7, 2013

The Delicate Art of Getting Things Done

Whether you're following your regular work calendar or having an impromptu meeting about the recent lack of ROI from your marketing team, today you will break up your schedule into the smallest units of time to get things done. You'll find yourself saying things like:

"I can have that to you by next week."
"Give me five minutes."
". . . just a second"

All of which you might be saying to others, yourself, or even your computer which is always slow to process whatever you're working on at the most inopportune moment. This process never ends as you map and plan out tomorrow's schedule.

And planning is, of course, a good thing.  In fact it's completely necessary - especially when it concerns our professional lives.  But when our professional lives become so dependent on time that we have to make time for family and friends, maybe it's time to stop and reevaluate how you spend your time. 

When reappropriating your time, consider:
  • Time for yourself:  topping the charts, this may or may not include time with family and friends, but it definitely excludes anything even remotely work related.  Stopping to smell the roses not only rejuvenates the body and mind, but it also allows you to reboot and take fresh perspectives for work, family, and personal activities.  This also includes mandatory physical exercise of the body and mind nourishment such as reading books and listening to music OUTSIDE OF YOUR CAR!
  • Time for your relationships:  from the family and friend side, this is ensures that you're not a negative topic that others roll their eyes at or hide your posts in facebook.  From the work perspective, your interpersonal relationships need to be nurtured to cultivate new ideas and conversation and not just talk about shared projects and upcoming meetings.  If you're going to play golf for example, play golf; but just play golf.
  • Time for work:  this has less to do with filling in your Google calendar and more to do with following your passion.  If you spend more time worrying about gaining or retaining clients and less time about the process of why your working with or for them, then you're wasting your time.  Work should always be pleasurable, and if it isn't, then it's definitely time to find work that you can feel passionate about.
Filling in a calendar can be easy enough, but realizing the delicate art of getting things done is more challenging and more rewarding.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Social Media: A Sales Perspective

I originally wrote this piece from Market Integration's website as:

Social Media - A Salesperson Perspective

posted Aug 23, 2011, 3:51 PM by Stirling Morris   [ updated Dec 12, 2011, 3:12 PM ]


We're all salespeople.  Whether you're a mom trying to explain to your child why practicing good hygiene is important or you're a CEO out to lunch with a new investor prospect, we all have something to sell.  Some of us are really good at it and some of us aren't.  But most of us don't even realize we're selling until our client (or child) agrees or disagrees with whatever we've pitched.

No matter who you are or what you do, social media is a not only a tool for networking but for selling.  Unfortunately, not every company has learned this lesson.  I actually had a General Manager of a sales company in the construction industry once tell me, “Networking must be limited to assure it does not take any time away from selling.”  I don't think he realized the power of social media in sales and networking.

I was asked by a Retail Sales Manager within the same company for advice regarding networking; particularly through social media.  After spending years as a sales / product representative in the construction industry, here are some of the finer points I offered:
  • In addition to joining professional organizations, social media is the key to business relationships for tomorrow to keep you informed when you can't be present or just to stay up-to-date with industry activities
  • Connecting and engaging with individuals and businesses on facebookLinkedin, Google+, and Twitter is vital to a successful, long-term relationship with tomorrow’s customers.
  • Most importantly, actively participating (e.g. joining groups, asking questions and giving answers) is the best way to make social media successful and you potentially seen as a Thought Leader. You can’t just create a social media profile / page and expect customers to come knocking. If people don’t see you engaged, they won’t follow back. And, if you only promote yourself, your business, or your services, you are committing sales suicide and will often be hidden or blocked by your customer's (or potential customer's) social media feeds.
Social Media helps us grow as people by creating interactive dialogue when a phone call or in-person visit or meeting isn't feasible.


Wednesday, January 2, 2013

We Are All Children on facebook

The recent social media frenzy of people taking opposing positions on gun control after the Sandy Hook massacre reminded me of something I've been thinking about for quite some time. We are all children on facebook. All of us. This is true for social media across the board, but facebook (perhaps because it has over 1 billion users as of 2012), brings out the worst in our interpersonal communication skills.

We are all having to relearn how to communicate with each other through social media.  Personal networking, on facebook in particular, is like being in an elementary school yard playground.  There are different attitudes, cliques, and social perspectives.  All of them impact our interactions online and sometimes even in person.

Facebook is like a toy.  Perhaps what you call a toy is called a tool by some. It can be a tool to learn from, but a tool becomes a toy when it becomes a distraction.  When was the last time you let a week or even a day go by without logging into, reading about, or hearing someone talking about facebook.  

Perhaps it's because we all have different reasons for using facebook.  For most of us, it is about making and maintaining personal connections with new and long forgotten relationships.  But, just like our face-to-face relationships, we have to learn (or re-learn) why we want to connect or even stay connected.  So, what are some ways we can improve our facebook interpersonal communication skills?

Be transparent
Say (comment, post, share) thoughts you would also say in person.  Since thought is nested in speech (and our written communications), there is nothing wrong with speaking (or writing) what's on your mind.  It's easy to be a social media lurker or hide behind snide comments and smiley faces. But if you are transparent, you will soon learn who your online friends really are. 

Take time to read
If you see a comment from someone that relates to an article, read the article before formulating a response.  Comments and quotes taken out of context demonstrate a desire to share but not necessarily a complete depiction of someone's thoughts or intent.

Take time to write
Don't be a victim of the texting mindset.  Facebook offers you a place to form complete thoughts that aren't limited by characters or time.  Even if you're a lousy speller, use punctuation and capitalization correctly to avoid misinterpretations.

Spam happens
No one likes spam in their inbox, so why would you want it in your facebook feed?  By writing, "Touchdown!" you're assuming one, we're watching the same football game, and, two, that we even care about football.  It's okay to say what you feel on facebook; just make sure the rest of us know what it is you're talking about.

Your wall vs your friend's wall

How would you like it if I showed up to your house for dinner, and, while you were cooking, told you how stupid it was to be cooking the way you were?  It's one thing to voice an opinion on your own wall (and expect that others will disagree), but it's quite another to berate people on their own wall. 

Don't take it personally
Unfriending on facebook is not the end of the world just as friending on facebook doesn't create (or re-create long lost) friendships. I have developed many wonderful, meaningful online relationships with people I've never met. Conversely, I've connected online with people I've met in person and ultimately unfriended them.  

You can't possibly predict how others will react to what you say on facebook. But, if you are transparent and true to yourself in your thoughts and actions, you'll soon learn who your real friends are. 

What interpersonal communication skills have you learned from facebook?