Showing posts with label business development. Show all posts
Showing posts with label business development. Show all posts

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Embracing The Local Market's Inner Customer

On any given day, embracing a specific market's customer is supremely more important than considering the customer-at-large. The local customer, with their personal preferences grounded in the every day world they live in, can be the most meaningful key performance indicator in determining the overall success of a business.

Even a mom and pop shop on Small Business Saturday can learn something from their larger corporate brothers and sisters. An REI in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where the focus of living outdoors is literally achieved right outside the front doors, is entirely different than the REI in Plano, Texas, where, unless you're doing some urban backpacking, you have to travel just a little further out. Each store's appearance may seem the same, but the customer experience and general atmosphere is entirely different.

How a business interacts with their most immediate community is also a huge indicator of success. Are they active in local community events and government affairs? Yes, Corporate Social Responsibility is huge factor here, but it goes beyond that. The local community requires something different from any local business, no matter how large or small or corporately driven and regardless of the business-to-business considerations.

A business' involvement in the local community is, and should always be, inspired by something completely different and relative to the part of the world that that business serves. The takeaway isn't the revenue generation itself, but how a business' investment in the community is perceived and ultimately shared, locally and globally.

What are your thoughts on the customer experience where specific markets are concerned?

Friday, January 1, 2016

We Are All Leaders of the New Year

We are all leaders. We choose to take lead of some, if not hopefully every, aspect of our lives. And although each of us is completely accountable for our individual actions, our actions ultimately serve the greater good. 

So this year, and every year . . . 

Make your interactions the most they can be. Instead of just meeting someone new or rekindling an existing relationship, find each and every way you can work together to make a difference. 

Read books, articles, & blogs that focus on innovation that matters. Not innovation that only serves to boost you, your brand, or even your industry, but rather innovation that makes a difference for human progress. 

Write. I know this is a tough one for some. Heck, it's tough for me. But you don't have to call yourself a writer to write. Just write, and I think you might be surprised by what comes out. 

By the end of this new year, we want look forward into the next, not backward, and realize that our choices matter. Because we only grow when each of us has recognized that leadership is a choice, not a fate.

How will you lead this year? What difference will you make? 

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Don't Be A Tool, Be A Resource


With all the tools we have at our disposal, the greatest one lies just behind your eyes and between your ears. Your thinking self. Your mind. Your mind provides you with the ability to transform thought into memory, and long term memories into constant resources.

Taking this all a step further, we're not only resources to ourselves but to others as well. Our ability to think interpersonally helps drive us to be all we can be. We weave ourselves into the tapestry of our lives and our business. 

In business though, it's not enough to want it, you have to sell it. You have to ask:  Am I a tool or am I a resource? Am I acting for the sake of what somebody wants or expects, as quickly and long forgotten as a unitasker, or am I the resource:  the person always remembered for contributions to peers, to the industry, and ultimately, to the world-at-large.

Be a resource for your peers.


Helping them understand a different point of view, helps everyone. And since not everyone learns the same way, read, write, & explore new ways to envision the world around you. 

Be a resource for your business plan.

Walking the straight and narrow is a helluva lot easier than making waves, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't splash around. Take an innovative approach to your business model.


Be a resource for your customers and clients.

Today's customer may want a quick fix, but that's not all they want. They want to know more. They want to be more. They want to inspire and be inspired. And since you're the customer too, help others be the game changer you want to be.

Be a resource for your industry.

Profit keeps the business model alive. Given. But when you put money first, you've burdened the industry with the chore of ignoring you for fear you're always trying to sell something. When, in fact, all you're trying to do is be the change you want to see in the world.

Be a resource for the World.

We live, every moment, with each other. And at the end of the day, we can sell for the sake of profit or we can sell whatever makes the world a better place to live in, now and in the future. Reinvent sales and change the story.

Be a part of the story. It's your story. And whether you choose to or not, it doesn't matter because you're already a part of the world around you. Be yourself, but be the best version of yourself. Ready. Set. Go.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Social Media Teaches Us

In Marketing, it's important for business owners, small in particular, to integrate and aggregate ideas as much as possible, as soon as possible. Your time is valuable. And, since you can't avoid Social Media Marketing as a necessary business development tool, it's important to remember that Social Media teaches us to:


Deal with opinions:  You're going to have them and that's okay. How you express or respond to them is another story. Don't dismiss the bad in favor of the good, and always, always respond to everyone and every situation.

Call everyone out:  No one likes being called out, but we all need to be. There are plenty of examples of this thought but certainly nothing more comparable than being a parent. Managing a business is a lot like being a parent.

Recognize the youngest person in the room:  Well, young may be relative, so how about:  recognize the person with the freshest idea at the time - not necessarily the best idea, but certainly the newest & the boldest - even if it's as quickly dismissed as it is heard.

Most importantly, it's critical to stay on the innovative & early adoption side of technologies, tools, & resources. This is true even if you have a dedicated team managing marketing and influencing your brand. And all of this is just the start because Social Media Marketing never sleeps and never stops. 

What does Social Media teach you?


Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Online Engagement: A Brief Sales Perspective

I was recently asked how I leverage Linkedin as a sales tool. Since we all sell something, I realized that a lot of my thoughts could relate to most online engagement. Here are some highlights when leveraging online engagement as a sales tool: 

Feeling Comfortable Online
It's important to have a particular comfort level with both social media engagement and even social media marketing in general. I have been leveraging the finer attributes of many social media platforms for a few years now, and so I am able to easily stay up to speed as they evolve.

Transparency in the Marketplace
I believe you can be 100% transparent in your personal convictions while maintaining a positive professional demeanor. This is more of a delicate art on Linkedin than the often crude, unforgiving nature of facebook or the relentlessly rolling feeds on Twitter, but it can be done.

Creating New Relationships
With social media, it’s not about connecting with who you know that’s important - that’s the easy part. Developing new relationships is lot more challenging but unquestionably more rewarding when interacting with individuals, businesses, groups, and organizations on a professional level. 

I like to think that there is a road between Marketing and Business Development and Sales. Somedays, I just wear my Marketing hat, while other days I might start out in the Business Development land but end up in Sales city. But no matter where I start, online engagements help me travel between each.

How do you leverage online engagements to improve your sales strategies?

Wednesday, April 2, 2014

Spring Clean Your Marketing!

Springtime! While you're opening the windows, tightening the clothesline, and preparing the mop water, it's also a great time to clean up the cobwebs around your personal and business marketing strategies.

For many businesses, this time of year marks the end of a first quarter. As results are reviewed, it's also an ideal time to review and adjust your Marketing Plan. Here are just a few questions to consider:

  • Did the the marketing strategies help achieve the desired business goals? Finding the ROI in marketing is as critical to review as sales and profit reviews.
  • What strategies and activities need to be reconsidered or revised? Avoid the 'this is the way we've always done it' mindset and change the way the you do business
  • Are there new or additional marketing strategies to integrate? Marketing, like every other piece of a business model, is a process of continuous improvement.
  • Do staff & coworkers fully leverage social media? Encouraging others to engage is as important as ensuring content is relevant
This chore is equally important for your personal marketing deployment. Among other questions, ask yourself:
  • When was the last time I updated my social media personal profiles? Freshen up your online appearance and discover yourself all over again
  • Do I need to add or remove any personal connections? Keep or find the connections that add value to personal & career ambitions. Moreover, clicking 'Remove' is more meaningful than clicking 'Hide'.
  • Am I making the most of my online interactions? Remember: social media is about sharing, so . . . share
  • What platforms do I need to be more active on? Connecting across the social media universe is always better than only engaging on Linkedin.
Marketing defines us. It is a reflection of our personal endeavors and our professional engagements. So while you're finding the time to clean up the other parts of your life and business, why not take a moment to spring clean your marketing strategies?


Thursday, November 14, 2013

Where Does Marketing Begin?




Whether you are a solopreneur, a start-up team with a new innovative concept, an existing business looking to revamp its business model, or an industry specific non-profit organization:


Marketing begins with the individual. Marketing is as much about the individual as it is about the collective whole. It all begins with ownership and executive leadership and touches every staff person, subcontractor, supplier, and, ultimately, customer.


Marketing requires planning. No matter the size of the business or organization, having a Marketing Plan is just as critical as a Business Plan. It is a supplemental piece that is a tool for monitoring & measuring Marketing both internally and externally.


Having a separate Social Media Marketing Plan can be a good supplemental component of the Marketing Plan.


Marketing weaves itself throughout every business, market, & industry. From Advertising & Business Development through Sales & Customer Service, Marketing plays a huge part of business growth. It touches each and every employee, customer, and business relation with satisfaction at the root of success.


Marketing is a process of Continuous Improvement. Just as a Business Plan sets long term goals that takes into consideration our ever-evolving world, so must the Marketing Strategies. It’s not enough to adopt in business, you have to adapt.


Do you want to be seen (or have your business seen) as an innovator, an adopter, or a laggard. This will impact your business growth as you are viewed through the lens of the customer’s, employee’s, and public’s perception.


The Takeaway: Marketing is responsible for breathing life and changing the direction of how every person, business, and organization grows.


The impact of technology and innovation changes too rapidly for anyone to boast a solid solution to Marketing know-how. The best anyone can offer for marketing solutions guidance is an outline of where marketing is today and, more importantly, to encourage you to always ask:

Where is marketing going tomorrow?

Saturday, June 15, 2013

Don't Get Caught Marketing With Your Pants Down

Being transparent in marketing and business is critical. This is especially true considering the public perception of your Marketing is (or at least, should be) found throughout the business model. However, it's equally important to never get caught with your pants down in Marketing.

People today are plugged in everywhere they go. Their digital quick capture cameras and social media smartphone apps are ready and waiting to have a reason to post your dirty laundry. So, unless you have a PR department or consultant on staff ready to play spin doctor, it's important to protect your transparent self and your business as much as you can. Here are a couple of tips:
  • Be prepared with a Marketing Plan and marketing strategies that are meaningful and purposeful to you, your staff, your market, & your industry. Marketing strategies should easily be assessed, evaluated, and streamlined every year when the Marketing Plan is revamped.
  • Don't get left behind technology-wise. Spending too much time trying to catch up with the latest technological trends long after they've had their hay day, hurts staff productivity and, ultimately, eats away at the bottom line of revenue.
  • Always strive to be on the cutting edge of innovation. This doesn't meant that a business needs to have a Research & Development team. It just implies that your business is perceived as the one of the first in your market or industry to incorporate innovative business tactics.
  • If you say you're going to do something, then do it. Empty promises & white lies always have the potential to tarnish the public perception of you and your business. This is applicable at all levels, for all personnel, and at all stages of the business model. This will help solidify you as a thought leader.
What marketing strategy tips or suggestions do you have that help a business from getting caught with their pants down?

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Marketing: The Common Thread of Every Business Tapestry

From Advertising & Business Development through Sales & Customer Service, Marketing plays a huge part of business growth. It is an integrative thread woven in and out of the overall business model. It links together information that can be reviewed, assessed, and evaluated to determine future growth strategies.

Marketing is as much about the individual as it is about the collective whole. It touches every staff person, subcontractor, vendor / supplier, and customer. The public perception of your business is defined by the interactive color tapestry that bleeds bright with each momentous achievement and can fade just as easily with each misstep.

Every threaded needle starts somewhere. For Marketing, it all begins with ownership and executive leadership. An owner is responsible for the size & scope of the tapestry and the breadth of colors that a business projects. Even the smallest business can shine as bright as a corporation when a leader weaves a design people like.

The next interwoven piece is Internal Marketing. Internal Marketing essentially is the process of marketing a business' mission and vision to all of its employees in order to improve morale, core competencies, and, ultimately, customer relations. This involves everyone, from office administration through sales & service personnel. The mantra of effective Internal Marketing is: support the staff that supports the business and business will grow.

Finally, the Marketing thread weaves it's internal formulated pattern through the various arms of your Business Model that touch each customer, business relation, and the general public. These might include:
  • Business Development
  • Advertising
  • Public Relations / Publicity
  • Sales
  • Customer Service
Each of these business components can change the overall business tapestry. When one or more is stained or frayed, changes will be needed. Since Marketing is the common thread of business, you can change the color or direction of the tapestry by taking away what works and what doesn't. The marketing thread is responsible for breathing life, adding color, and changing the direction of how every business grows.

Wednesday, March 13, 2013

Business Development: The Bridge Between Marketing & Sales

How do you define Business Development?

Whenever I talk or write about Business Development with small (or even medium sized) business owners and representatives, they frequently ask: what is business development? It's amazing to me how many business folks, from owners to managers to sales & marketing representatives, have varying opinions on what it is and what it means.

The term has been explored by the always insightful marketing guru, Seth Godin, and even Forbes over the last few years, but even they refer to it as business puzzle yet to be fully realized. Perhaps it's because Business Development is a relatively newer term. Or maybe it's that there are few books or college courses that even address what it can mean to any business in any given market or industry. What is certain is that Business Development has moved beyond just being the latest buzz term. It has planted itself firmly in Marketing efforts, Sales Cycles and, ultimately, Business Plans regardless of the unsolved mystery of what it really means.

In it it's simplest form, Business Development is the bridge between Marketing & Sales. Most of this transition has been made easier with our online communications and especially CRM (Customer Relationship Management) resources. With CRMs - even the free options - Sales representatives can record their activities as leads migrate from traceable Marketing & Advertising efforts.

It's not enough just to record your Marketing & Sales efforts. Businesses, large and small, have to monitor their Business Development activities, analyze the data, and provide reports with meaningful information for Continuous Improvement (another fashionable buzz term.) Continuous Improvement is the underlying link between creating improved customer relations, employee satisfaction and work habits, and Business & Marketing Plan development. Or in simpler terms, Business Development on the front end and continuous improvement on the back end.

Implementing Business Development strategies is a key to maintaining an effective revenue. It is the gateway transitional element carried forward from your initial Marketing & Advertising efforts to give purpose, meaning, and structure to the Sales Cycle. It is because of Business Development that successful businesses are able to move and think beyond the Business Plan for purposeful Continuous Improvement.

What Business Development strategies have worked best for you?

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Determining The Value of Seminars & Presentations

When it comes to presentations and seminars in your market or industry, some are free and some cost the same as a great used car.  Some last all week and others can be given as a one hour lunch and learn. The worst are those that have great marketing to get you there, but offer absolutely nothing of value once you sit down. With so many options, how does anyone determine the value of seminars & presentations?

I've heard this question asked multiple times from individuals, businesses, & organizations, big and small, and there doesn't appear to be one answer.  There are so many types of seminars & presentations and these are further distorted by market and industry.  Through my career presentation experiences (giving and receiving), I have found there are two common denominators in determining the value of presentations & seminars - an enlightening presenter & a willing audience.

An Enlightening Presenter

I have heard many people say that a charismatic speaker can carry an audience no matter what the topic, atmosphere, or setting.  There are many things that make a speaker great, including charisma.  But when it comes to seminars & presentations, I want to be enlightened not charmed.

An enlightening presenter demonstrates as much, if not more, innovative thought as knowledge.  Don't spin and dance around what I already know or can read by myself.  Inspire me.  Most importantly, by the time the seminar or presentation is finished I should want to inspire others.

A Willing Audience

The value of an education is dependent on the work we put into it. I think a lot of adults forget this and look at education as a means to an end.  This is a huge mistake when it concerns the value of a presentation or seminar. The audience has just as much responsibility to enlighten themselves before and after they participate, if not just on a surface level.

Let's take marketing, for example.  If you plan on attending a Marketing seminar that is going to focus on how to integrate Google+ as a social media marketing tool for your business, show up having already registered for and experimented with the platform.  If you don't, this will only cause frustration for you.

Information and knowledge are not synonymous. A great seminar or presentation is lost on an audience unwilling to educate themselves before the event and then use that knowledge to further their education after.
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Learning always comes with a price if not just in the form of your time.  The value of a presentation or seminar depends just as much on your eagerness to be inspired as it for the presenter to be inspiring.  If this type of inspiration is present, then the cost becomes inconsequential - well, almost.

What are some examples of seminars or presentations that have inspired you?

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Finding the Value in Marketing for Small Businesses

The end of the year is a great time to assess your marketing efforts for the past year and map out your plans for the new year. For small businesses this can be a struggle, especially if you don't have a Marketing Plan already in place to get you there. Since having a Marketing Plan is critical component of developing a successful Business Plan, what are some steps to put one in place?


Know Thyself

An initial consideration in developing marketing strategies is to appreciate that there are no quick fixes. Cheap and fast is the mantra of the online marketing world, but it will not satisfy your long term marketing needs.  Finding the time and money to develop an effective Marketing Plan can be an obstacle easily overcome by understanding your business' value proposition.  

A value proposition is a unique selling point that doesn't compromise quality for price. Your value proposition is the inherent, not necessarily the monetary, worth of the product or service you offer. Once you know your business' Value Proposition, your ROI (return on investment) from your marketing efforts will be all the more meaningful.

What is your business' value proposition?

Help Wanted

Assuming you don't possess the marketing know-how to do your own marketing, another important consideration is who you contract with or hire to help with your marketing.  

It may seem like a cheap solution to hire college kids or young adults to help with your marketing because they presumably possess social media "skills”, but this will only hurt the customer and ultimately your business. The young person you hire will likely lack the business acumen that will make your marketing successful.  

Unless you hire a person with experience in marketing, sales, or business development, hiring a consulting firm to develop and manage your marketing is a must.

The better marketing consultant or firm is the one that focuses on marketing and nothing else. 

Plan Ahead

A small business will benefit from having a simplified Marketing Plan. As your business grows, you can add on more marketing efforts. Initially, you will have more success in mapping out your marketing strategies by:
  • Building a Marketing Plan: even if it's just an outline, put a model into action; you can't possibly know where you're going if you don't map out the route
  • Having all of your staff contribute to marketing efforts: each of your staff members brings a different perspective to the table; if you are your only employee then this should be easy
  • Regular monitoring and analyzing: monitoring your marketing efforts can be a daily activity, but you should be reviewing and revamping your Marketing Plan as often as your Business Plan - no less than once yearly
Can you function without a formalized Marketing Plan? Yes. Will you have more success with one? Unquestionably.

Friday, October 19, 2012

Connecting Across the Social Media Universe

A majority of the people I work with are small business owners. One of the most common concerns I hear about revolves around how to manage all of their social media marketing efforts in the most time efficient manner.  

My response typically involves explaining the difference between Social Media Marketing and Social Media networking. Both involve relationship building, and both are crucial to business success. However, Social Media Marketing is about helping the business as a whole grow, whereas Social Media networking is more about helping the individual grow.  

Focusing on Social Media networking is a great place for small business owners to start. It sets the stage for personal growth, but it can also lead to establishing the individual as a thought leader. So how does an individual make the most of Social Media networking? 

Be Accessible

Recently, I communicated with a friend of a friend through facebook messaging. She is applying for a position that requires knowledge of social media marketing, and she wanted to know if I had suggestions in how to show the employer that she possesses solid Marketing acumen. I looked for her Linkedin profile and couldn't find her. I then asked if she could forward me the link for her Linkedin profile; she never responded. Additionally, I sent a facebook connect request. She told me that she didn't like to connect with people she didn't know online.

The first step of effective Social Media networking is being accessible. Employers, customers, professional acquaintances - anyone and everyone should be able to see your personal and professional profiles across social media platforms. As a small business owner, you are your business' first and best marketing resource. Chris Brogan & Julien Smith refer to this concept in their collaborative book and now coined phrase, "Trust Agents". Other terms exist as well including "thought leader" and "expert", but what is most important is that this is how others perceive you and not how you should refer to yourself.

Participate

Years ago, when I first became actively involved in construction, I started noticing CSI and other initials behind various people's names. As it turned out, being a CSI (Construction Specifications Institute) member was held in high regard by construction industry professionals. Moreover, other certifications one could get through CSI were held in even higher regard because they demonstrated a person's knowledge of the construction industry and a thorough understanding of the construction documents.

I also started seeing that people (including an ex-employer) were paying dues to be able to use the initials but then never participating. Yeah, sure, they might show up at an event or two throughout the year, but they would never volunteer to be on committees or boards.

Social Media, like industry specific groups, isn't just about connections; it's about how you engage with other social media participants. With social media, the old adage, "if you're not part of the solution, then you're part of the problem" holds true. If you only have social media profiles because everyone does, then you're only creating online clutter. Why would anyone want to connect with someone who only wants to friend, circle, or follow other people to build up their contact list but then not engage on any level?

There are various ways to actively participate online: posting questions and articles that you think others might glean knowledge from, joining groups and giving insightful perspectives, writing white papers / technical papers for your industry and sharing them, and blogging are all great ways to stay engaged and involved. 

Building Relationships

Whenever I connect or am asked to connect with a person on one social media platform, I always cross reference their name across other platforms. There are several reasons to cross reference, not the least of which is determining if they are spammers or a real person or business entity. I also do it to see how innovative they are. Lately, my measurement tool has been Google+, the largest, newest social media platform. If a person is on facebook but not Google+ and they claim to be a progressive thinker, I have to wonder if they're being truthful.

Not all social media platforms function the same way or serve the participants in the same ways, but all of them can be used to build meaningful relationships. Additionally, there's no reason you can't have business messages on facebook and playful banter on Linkedin. And now, with smartphones and tablets, there's definitely no reason that concise communications can't be achieved through instant messaging on social media platforms as opposed to, say, emails.

Connecting across the social media universe is a rewarding and life-enriching experience.  It has become just as important as networking face-to-face; not more important, just another great step to successful relationships. Whether you're a student looking to learn from a business professional in your field of study, a product representative looking to connect with an architect across the country, or a follower of a blog from someone on the other side of the world, online connections set new bearings for relationships.  

Thursday, October 18, 2012

Marketing Class Meet & Greet in Albuquerque!


Marketing Class Meet & Greet in Albuquerque!

Market Integrations & Tech Love are partnering to offer Marketing Development Classes in Albuquerque!

Marketing Class Meet & Greet 

with Stirling Morris, Owner of Market Integrations, Marketing Instructor
and Tom Carlson, Owner of Tech Love & NM PCMD

Have you ever wondered, "What's the difference between a Google+ page and a Google+ profile?"  Or "What the heck is Google+ and how can it possibly benefit my business?"

Come meet Stirling Morris of Market Integrations on Tuesday, October 23rd at 5:30 p.m. at Tech Love, 3901 Central Ave NE, find out what he has planned for the upcoming Marketing Classes, and discover ways to improve your business' Marketing Strategies.  This Meet & Greet event is free!
Stirling Morris, Marketing Executive

Market Integrations | Marketing Development & Communication Management

Marketing for Beginners

No matter how proficient you may feel in marketing, marketing resources change as often as the computers, smartphones, and tablets that carry them. Learning how to integrate an actionable Marketing Plan with effective Marketing Strategies will help youand your business evolve through a process of continuous improvement.

More advanced classes coming soon!

Although the focus of this Meet & Greet will be to discuss the current class objectives and to learn about the instructor and the venue, information about more advanced classes is coming soon.  Private orcustomized marketing tutoring is available now!

General learning objectives will revolve around:

Classes are planned to begin on or around October 30th with pricing and exact dates and times to be announced at the event.  There will be options for lunch-and-learns as well as evening classes.  You do not have to attend the Meet & Greet event to participate in the classes.

Interested in this Meet & Greet?  Please register on facebook at:  https://www.facebook.com/events/442475045794498/?context=create

Light refreshments will be provided by Tom CarlsonTech Loveand NM PC MD, servicing Mac and PC systems in New Mexico since 1987!

You won't feel a thing! NM PC, MD, You won't feel a thing!
Marketing Class Meet & Greet in Albuquerque! - Market Integrations

Friday, October 5, 2012

Marketing Strategies Are Only Part of the Marketing Plan

In my marketing experiences, I find it scary how often businesses don't have a formalized written Business Plan, much less a formalized Marketing Plan. I talk to a lot of business owners, particularly small, that say they have it all up in their head. But how can a business be effective without a standard to measure themselves by?

As part of a formalized, written Business Plan, the Marketing Plan (a supplemental, formalized written document supporting your Business Plan) sets the precedence for the year's marketing goals.  At a bare minimal, a solid Marketing Plan will include objectives and strategies to measure the results.    Assessing and evaluating the results for financial and inter-departmental alignment is also important to revamping a Marketing Plan, but these considerations are completely dependent on a business' planned aims and Marketing Strategies.


Like other small and independent business owners, I make lots of mental notes in addition to more carefully, thought out marketing strategizing. In today's evolving marketing world, however, this is not enough.  It is necessary for businesses to review and manage their marketing strategies, objectives, and action items daily or even multiple times a day.  

A basic outline of meaningful Marketing Strategies should at least include:
  • having a predetermined tracking & measurement system in place
  • analytical resources to measure audience engagements & marketing trends
  • a system of interpreting these trends and engagement measures for re-alignment and continuous improvement
With these and any other effective Marketing Strategy considered, revamping the overall Marketing Plan can be part of revamping the Business Plan which at least needs to be annually.  If a business has the personnel to make Marketing Plan adjustment more often, there are ideal times. These vary by market and industry, but might include:
  • Nationally recognized holiday, election, & vacation seasons
  • Changes in principal personnel and key decision makers
  • Significant market and industry changes that might have major financial or legal ramifications
Changes to the Marketing Plan in these situations need to be assessed and revamped both before and after these adjustment periods.  More importantly, these changes assume that a business, business owner, or key decision makers are in touch with their market and industry enough to see the need for change ahead of time and act accordingly.

Managing Marketing Strategies is just as critical as developing a Marketing Plan.  However, it is important to understand the difference between having effective Marketing Strategies and having those strategies support the Marketing Plan.  Understanding this distinction will help a business make timely & effective determinations that impact the overall Business Plan.

Marketing Strategies Are Only Part of the Marketing Plan - Market Integrations