Monday, March 11, 2019

Value Engineering The Project Team

Construction project teams are some of the most diverse groups you can ever work with. From owners, architects, and city councils working through design conception to subcontractors and building supervisors addressing facility management - and through all phases of construction in between - every team member is vital to each project's success. Project teams represent who we are and who we choose to be.

Make no mistake, trust is huge factor to make this work. To ensure trust is a deliverable, every project team member works as diligently as the next to grow themselves, their company's vision, and the project in turn. When project teams learns to value one another, the resulting dynamic are projects that grow and evolve as much as individuals do. Trust may be earned, but it should never be limited.

Being humble is another important aspect in delivering successful projects. When individuals place themselves above others, they negate all of the positive potential that defines the construction process - a process that creates every resource we use, every road we travel, and every structure we live, work, and play in. Construction project teams don't just build; they are a representation of our communities.



Like all organized efforts, construction project teams work to create innovative solutions through a process of continuous improvement. Continuous improvement strategies build upon existing work to improve future deliverables. When one part of the team feels empowered, the entire team can sense that empowerment throughout the project life cycle. An empowered project team encourages others to develop continuous improvement exercises, for both the job at hand as well as future developments.

As with every industry and sector working around the globe, project teams have an obligation to assist each other, the project, and continuous improvement processes to deliver successful projects. No matter the role, a project team's success is fully dependent on encouraging diversity and embracing equity in the workplace. Shared equity in work practices is how we value engineer project teams and design a sustainable future.


Originally shared by Stirling Morris here, https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/value-engineering-project-team-stirling-morris-csi-cdt/ 

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

Celebrate Success With A Reboot

Success! We all crave it and love to celebrate it. But after the party ends, perhaps that's an ideal moment to reboot and hone in on what you can do better yet.

Rebooting offers us the opportunity to discover better strategies to improve our lives and our relationships. Consider the movie version Tony Stark from The Avengers. He goes from carefree, burger-gorging playboy, to growing through the many phases of just being IronMan, and, ultimately, into the blueberry-eating, sustainable design-building hero of The Avengers.

But the story doesn't stop there. Tony continues to re-define himself, his team, and relationships. Each success becomes a jumping off point for the next venture. Individuals like Richard Branson and Elon Musk do the same, and global enterprises like Google and Amazon are no strangers to this way of continuous improvement. Continuous improvement exercises are at the core of many successful organizational models globally. Strategies like Kaizen (改善) are also often employed and embrace activities that continuously improve an organization's complete infrastructure involving all employees, from the CEO to the people on the assembly line or in the field.

Celebrating the win is never more important than the action that led you there and certainly not as critical as what you do next - this being as true for science and business as it is for politics and sports. But, if your main objective is to win, well, then, you've already lost. 

Winning is only a stepping stone. If you're not talking about the next big thing, then you're talking about the wrong thing. It's about the long game. It's about healthy, sustainable living over brand and personality. It's about standing on the shoulders of giants and reaching ever higher. It's about change. Progress takes change.

So at the end of the day, by all means, celebrate your successes - frequently and happily. But when you get the chance, reboot and set the tone for our shared lives tomorrow.


Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Trustworthy


We may not always agree with decisions made by others, but we should always strive to work with those decisions. In some cases, this does mean finding ways to work without them.

But if we always operate with integrity, passion, and kindness, our agreeing with others has little impact on our successes. People tend to always work for, buy from, coordinate with people they trust.

This is especially true when choosing to recommend others. To be referred is the ultimate test of being considered trustworthy. Where trust is concerned, our ability to work with others is the lifeblood of our success. 

Wednesday, January 24, 2018

Inspired by Firsts

We are driven by firsts. 

Our first time to do something is spectacular. Growing up in Texas, I remember visiting the mountains for the first time. I remember my first kiss, my first car, my first dog, and even my first college road trip. Sorry, Jim, I still owe you money - what's the interest after 25 years by the way?

Public, professional, and cultural firsts are as equally exciting as they are inspiring. Our first trip to the moon, our first smartphone, our first planned mission to Mars. Ok. Maybe we're not quite there yet, but we're closer than we've ever been, and that's a first.



Firsts drive us. They motivate and inspire us. They send our brains a signal that something wonderful is or is about to happen. After all, we are, first and always, stewards of our future.

What firsts have inspired you?

Saturday, November 26, 2016

Embracing The Local Market's Inner Customer

On any given day, embracing a specific market's customer is supremely more important than considering the customer-at-large. The local customer, with their personal preferences grounded in the every day world they live in, can be the most meaningful key performance indicator in determining the overall success of a business.

Even a mom and pop shop on Small Business Saturday can learn something from their larger corporate brothers and sisters. An REI in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where the focus of living outdoors is literally achieved right outside the front doors, is entirely different than the REI in Plano, Texas, where, unless you're doing some urban backpacking, you have to travel just a little further out. Each store's appearance may seem the same, but the customer experience and general atmosphere is entirely different.

How a business interacts with their most immediate community is also a huge indicator of success. Are they active in local community events and government affairs? Yes, Corporate Social Responsibility is huge factor here, but it goes beyond that. The local community requires something different from any local business, no matter how large or small or corporately driven and regardless of the business-to-business considerations.

A business' involvement in the local community is, and should always be, inspired by something completely different and relative to the part of the world that that business serves. The takeaway isn't the revenue generation itself, but how a business' investment in the community is perceived and ultimately shared, locally and globally.

What are your thoughts on the customer experience where specific markets are concerned?